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Medical Marijuana and Veterans

By: Sally Seck

An estimated 20% of American veterans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. A common statistic that we hear is 22: that's the daily average number of veteran suicides, most due to the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder and the difficulty of transitioning back into civilian life. 

Dr. Sue Sisley is a VA physician who has dedicated her professional life to treating veterans with PTSD, and she has secured the first federal grant to study marijuana as a potentially federally-approved treatment for the disorder. Currently, Zoloft and Paxil are the only two federally-approved drugs to treat the disorder, and due to the high number of veterans who's PTSD is classified as "treatment resistant," those aren't entirely effective. The study will take three years and will monitor the effects of marijuana on veterans who haven't responded positively to other treatments. 

Just last week in Illinois, a state judge ordered that PTSD be added to the state's list of approved conditions to qualify for medical marijuana rights. In several other medical states, PTSD is already an approved condition. In New Mexico, it is the most common condition for medical patients--almost double the number of patients using cannabis to treat their chronic pain. However, here in Colorado, it is not on the approved list. While many veterans know from experience that cannabis provides them with therapeutic relief for mental and physical ailments, more research is still needed in order to convince everyone. 

At NuVue, we are dedicated to developing the most effective medicine for all who would benefit from it. We admire the veterans who have sacrificed everything to serve our country, and as a thank you, we offer 10% off of every purchase, everyday to those who served. 

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SEED-TO-HARVEST: VEG AND BLOOM

PART FIVE OF OUR SEED-TO-HARVEST SERIES 

If you follow this blog, you know that we have been tracking NuVue’s growth alongside the growth of our plants. Our last post in the seed-to-harvest series examined light cycles for both indoor and outdoor marijuana plants. 

Light cycles are critical in triggering flowering, or bud production. Manipulation of the length of a plant’s day and night controls the direction in which marijuana plants are growing.  At NuVue, as with most other marijuana gardens, we take our little seedlings or our little clones and we put them into a space designed for optimally vegetative growth.

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We're Open!

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We're Open!

We are so excited to welcome you to NuVue Pharma's medical dispensary. Come check us out at 4740 Dillon Drive in Pueblo. 

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Growing Conditions: Light Cycles Indoors and Out

By: Sally Seck

PART FOUR OF OUR SEED TO HARVEST SERIES

In this series, we've looked at marijuana genetics: varietal selection, types of seeds, and clones. Once you've got the genetics, you are on to growing.

Marijuana grown indoors requires significant controls to create an ideal growing environment. Many people know that flowering, or bud production, is triggered and maintained by the introduction of a 12 hours on, 12 hours off light cycle. Temperature, humidity and air circulation are other crucial environmental factors determining the production of marijuana.

All of the work that goes into engineering a marijuana grow facility is aimed at learning from and improving the natural conditions in which the plant thrives. There are ideal ranges for temperature and humidity, and sufficient airflow is necessary to prevent stagnation. The irony is that while the ideal conditions for marijuana plants to thrive indoors are precise, the plant thrives in an incredible variety of climates outdoors. It is for this reason that the common belief that indoor grows are designed mimic nature is not quite accurate. 

Outdoor plants are grown in the summer, when bud production is triggered by the change in photoperiod. That’s when it is 12-12, which throws the plants into flower, right? Yes, but that is definitely an oversimplifcation. At and near the equator, there is a constant photoperiod of 12-12, so plants can flower outside at any time of the year in, say, southern Columbia.

More interestingly, outdoor plants actually need at least twelve hours of light per day, not exactly. This can vary from strain to strain, and some indoor growers have experimented with flowering in, say, a 14-10 cycle (fourteen hours of light and ten hours of darkness) for a specific strain in order to increase yield.  This is likely due to the fact that marijuana evolved and adapted to grow all around the world, from Papua New Guinea to Morocco to Paraguay. The natural light cycle around the world varies wildly. Places further from the equator have more drastic light cycle changes. In the marijuana world, Alaska is famously anomalous: the light cycle doesn't approach 12-12 until late September. 

The variety of climates in which cannabis can thrive is truly amazing, as is the work that cultivation facilities must do, not to mimic nature, but to create an ideal growing environment. 

Have you ever heard of someone flowering in a light cycle other than 12-12? We'd love to hear from you in the comments. Hit subscribe to catch more on our journey from seed to harvest, as well as important news updates on NuVue and the industry. 

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NEWS BRIEF: MEDICAL MARIJUANA IN SCHOOLS

Colorado House Bill 1373 received unanimous approval from all 35 state Senators on Tuesday, May 3rd. This bill is of unique historical importance in the fight to recognize marijuana as medicine. It will require all public schools in the state to treat medical marijuana the same as any other medication, allowing students access to the medication they need during school hours.

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Making the Cut: A Closer Look at Clones

If you missed the latest blog post, we talked about the different types of marijuana seeds available to growers. Now we’re going to focus on the other side of the genetic coin: clones.

Cloning is a method of asexual reproduction in which a grower makes a copy of a plant. Many plants clone themselves in nature: grass, blackberries, strawberries, dandelions, and daylilies. Many others, like cannabis, are equipped to grow a new plant from a cutting, given the right conditions.

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Genetic Selection

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Genetic Selection

By: Sally Seck

We want to take you along for the journey as NuVue Pharma begins to sprout and grow roots in Pueblo, Colorado. Follow us here as we track the growth of our first crop from seed to harvest.

To start a garden, you must first decide what to grow. Like selecting the ideal heirloom tomato variety for your soil, climate, cooking needs and taste, there are many factors that go into choosing marijuana genetics.  

Marijuana offers a unique opportunity for genetic variety in its two species, indica and sativa. Naturally and through the design of breeders, cannabis has proven to have boundless potential in growth characteristics and effect on human health. Landrace strains continue to strengthen their naturally acclimated characteristics to their environments in the Middle East, Central America, Africa and many other regions around the globe. Concurrently, passionate marijuana growers have bred to adjust their strains’ resilience, taste, smell, and therapeutic effect.

With the growth of the medical marijuana industry, doors are opening up for increased study of cannabinoids and their unique medical benefits. We know that the indica and sativa species offer inverse ratios of THC and CBD, and that many people find the indica, CBD-heavy experience to be relaxing and relieving of physical pain while the sativa with more THC than CBD gives many a more invigorating relief from pain. However, the conversation about strain and effects does not end with that dichotomy. By focusing so much on THC and CBD, we may not be paying enough attention to the over-100 other cannabinoids naturally present in marijuana.

Most of the medicine you will find in medical dispensaries comes from a wide variety of well-known strains and stabilized crosses. Medical patients have long known that the unique combination of cannabinoids in each strain means that each strain has a different effect, and some can be uniquely suited to alleviate specific psychological and physical conditions. You might find that Chemdawg relieves your migraines, while your uncle prefers Bubba Kush to stimulate his appetite.

Our growers have selected the finest genetics available with quality and variety in mind. NuVue Pharma is looking to lead the way in providing cannabis suited for patients with medical needs across the spectrum, from seizures to cancer, PTSD to pain.

Have you found a particular strain that helps you? Comment below to share. 

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NEWS BRIEF: Federal Rescheduling of Marijuana in 2016?

By: Sally Seck

The Drug Enforcement Agency has been in conversation with the FDA on medical marijuana research and its status as a Schedule 1 drug.

A letter from the DEA dated April 4th (and released by the Huffington Post April 5th) addressed recent questions from several of the Democratic Senators cosponsoring The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act, a proposition introduced in March of 2015 to shield from federal law those abiding by their state marijuana regulations, expand research, and make marijuana a Schedule II drug. While that bill is stuck in Senate limbo, the DEA may be looking to make that schedule change anyway.

The bombshell in the letter isn’t that the DEA is considering a recommendation on rescheduling marijuana (mainly because there is no indication what that recommendation will be) but that there are “hopes to release its determination in the first half of 2016.” In addition to marijuana, CBD is being evaluated for scheduling determination as an isolated drug. 

A Schedule 1 Drug by definition has no medical benefit (as well as a “high potential for abuse”; therefore, changing its schedule has always depended on medical research. In addition to an inventory of the current marijuana available for federal research at the University of Mississippi, the letter discusses the potential to “increase the number of permits for the bulk manufacture of marijuana for research purposes,” in anticipation of the need for additional study and genetic variety in federal research.

It looks like the DEA is interested in expanding federal research beyond a single grow facility and 265 registered researchers. Looking at the breakdown of the marijuana available for research (the facility produces Placebo and Low, Medium, High and Very High THC varieties, each of which contain strains with very low to very high CBD content), it’s not hard to see that genetic variety is sorely needed in order to expand medical study to encompass each component of the endocannabinoid system.

The long-overdue removal of marijuana from Schedule 1 would signal the federal acknowledgement of marijuana as medicine and turn a major page in the story of medical cannabis.  At NuVue, we’re watching to see if that day is coming in 2016. 

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The Cannabis Car

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The Cannabis Car

This sports car looks like a Mazda Miata, all except for the door panel of George Washington smoking a joint. The prototype for the "greenest car in the world" was taken from a Miata, but the body is 100 percent hemp.

The hemp fibers were woven together, molded, and hardened with a resin before being covered in that eye-catching red paint. 

To read about it's drive through the Mile High City, or watch the video as owner, Bruce Dietzen, slams his fist into the hood of his cannabis car. CLICK HERE. 

 

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Cannabis For Kids

In this 20 minute documentary, by National Geographic, we see the medical benefits some children are seeing from cannabis. The video is hard to watch, but NuVue Pharma believes it is harder to ignore the issue.

Take a moment to open your heart and mind to the struggles these families, whose children are suffering, have to endure by watching National Geographic's Cannabis For Kids. Link below. 

VIDEO: Cannabis For Kids

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